minimrmn:

relyonloveonceinawhile:

whatmariadidnext:

two4fit:

TABLOID HEADLINES WITHOUT THE SEXISM

"WOMAN IN TRACKSUIT PROBABLY NOT DISOWNED BY ENTIRE FAMILY"

"It’s mildly breezy outside."

I love everything about these…

Ahh tabloids. If you stop paying attention to them they’ll have to end eventually…

(via emergentfutures)

"…the older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious."

Sophie Heawood  (via brosetta-stone)

(Source: featherfall, via theashleyclements)

parislemon:

Interesting to see Amazon as one of the first to implement sign-in with Touch ID. Wonder if we’ll see the same with Apple Pay…

parislemon:

Interesting to see Amazon as one of the first to implement sign-in with Touch ID. Wonder if we’ll see the same with Apple Pay…

BBC tells Australian govt to treat VPN users as pirates

mostlysignssomeportents:

BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the UK public broadcaster, has told an Australian government proceeding that people who use VPNs a lot should be assumed to be engaged in piracy, that ISPs should surveil their users, that websites should be censored by Chinese-style national firewalls, and that the families of people accused of watching TV the wrong way should be disconnected from the Internet.

Read more…

Wonder how many of those are UK citizens…

(via emergentfutures)

"You might think that the things that get people to change their behavior are things that are memorable, that they can use their analytical brain to set down a long-term trace, or even just emotional, but surprisingly what we see is the brain regions that seem to be involved in successful persuasion. We can predict who will use more sunscreen next week based on how their brain responds to an ad today. The brain regions that seem to be critical to that are brain regions involved in social thinking, in thinking about yourself and thinking about other people. So this seems to be more about our identity and the identities that we’re capable of trying on. If I can’t try on the identity that you’re suggesting to me—being a sunscreen-using person, or a nonsmoker, or something like that—the ad is much less likely to stick.

[…]

William James said long ago that we have as many identities as people that we know, and probably more than that. We are different with different people. I’m different with my son than I am with you. We have these different identities that we try on, and they surround us… I’m really interested in looking at that as a mechanism of persuasion when it comes to regular old persuasion, when it comes to education, when it comes to public health, and when it comes to international issues as well. It’s finding that latitude of acceptance and finding out how to use it successfully."

UCLA neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman, author of Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect, studies "latitudes of acceptance" to understand what makes us change our minds – something we’re notoriously reluctant to do.

Also see Dan Pink on the psychology of persuasion.

Lieberman’s full Edge conversation is well worth a read.

(via explore-blog)

Interesting reads

(via emergentfutures)

courtenaybird:

KPIs for Social Media According to Executives Worldwide - eMarketer:

"Advanced” metrics had generally seen the most growth. For example, engagement—the top KPI—had jumped 32% in the past two years, while sentiment tracking showed year-over-year growth of 38%. …
Still, web traffic as well as followers, fans and group size—simple and relatively useless figures—ranked second and third, which… was “slightly disconcerting.”



Social Media KPIs according to executives.

courtenaybird:

KPIs for Social Media According to Executives Worldwide - eMarketer:

"Advanced” metrics had generally seen the most growth. For example, engagement—the top KPI—had jumped 32% in the past two years, while sentiment tracking showed year-over-year growth of 38%. …

Still, web traffic as well as followers, fans and group size—simple and relatively useless figures—ranked second and third, which… was “slightly disconcerting.”

Social Media KPIs according to executives.

(via emergentfutures)

gkambadais:

Samples of my work, because i’m looking for work. And some news.

Trying to get back to everything. I had a couple of projects to work on but they didn’t work out. Financial problems still there, but i’m trying to solve them with commissions. I’m running like crazy all day and trying to find and another job to do to pay my bills. I did a couple of pitches and sent to some companies, so fingers crossed.

I’ll get back to Miranda Turner again soon, issue 4 is finished but not colored yet. I can’t wait to see it finished. I’ll start working again on issue 5 soon.

So, please reblog this and who knows maybe an editor will see it and offer me a job(i hope).

Thank you people and sorry. I promise i’ll post new stuff soon! Or even a webcomic, who knows?

(via marykatewiles)

humansofnewyork:

"When we graduate, my friend and I want to start an organization to teach people in rural areas how to read. I was volunteering at a clinic last year, and I saw a child die of Cholera because the mother couldn’t remember the prescription instructions."
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

humansofnewyork:

"When we graduate, my friend and I want to start an organization to teach people in rural areas how to read. I was volunteering at a clinic last year, and I saw a child die of Cholera because the mother couldn’t remember the prescription instructions."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

emergentfutures:

Household solar shift sees electricity demand drop and taxpayers stuck with ‘stranded assets’


Australia’s household solar revolution has caught the energy sector by surprise, and may leave NSW and Queensland taxpayers footing the bill for billions of dollars worth of “stranded assets”.
More than a million Australians have already installed solar panels on their roofs, causing demand for electricity from the grid to plummet.
For decades demand for electricity had grown, a trend the industry and government banked on.
Energy economist Greg Houston describes the solar take up as “a once-in-a-generation shift”.


Full Story: ABC

emergentfutures:

Household solar shift sees electricity demand drop and taxpayers stuck with ‘stranded assets’

Australia’s household solar revolution has caught the energy sector by surprise, and may leave NSW and Queensland taxpayers footing the bill for billions of dollars worth of “stranded assets”.

More than a million Australians have already installed solar panels on their roofs, causing demand for electricity from the grid to plummet.

For decades demand for electricity had grown, a trend the industry and government banked on.

Energy economist Greg Houston describes the solar take up as “a once-in-a-generation shift”.

Full Story: ABC